Mastering Markdown

Article
libs

25 days ago by libs

It’s been great to see so many new faces playing around with Bitpost over the last couple of days. We’ve received a few questions related to the Markdown editor so I thought I’d share a few tips to help you get the most out of Bitpost during this 30 day challenge.

What is Markdown

Markdown is a lightweight markup syntax that you can use to add formatting and document structure to your posts using plain text. It’s a little different to WYSIWYG editors you may be familiar with from applications like Microsoft Word, and there’s a small learning curve required to master the various syntax.

But persevere my friends. Once you get used to Markdown you’ll be turning drafts into beautifully formatted documents in no time at all.

The basics

The following examples should give you all the basics needed to craft great looking and well structured articles on Bitpost.

Headings

All writing has structure, and headings should be used to help readers scan through and understand the structure of your writing. Prefix a line of text with ## to turn it into a heading. The number of # characters denotes the level heading.

Pro tip: The title of your post is already the level 1 heading. Therefore in the body of your post it makes semantic sense to use levels 2 downwards to create structure to your post.

# Level 1

## Level 2

### Level 3

#### Level 4

##### Level 5

###### Level 6

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

Level 4

Level 5
Level 6

Text emphasis

Adding emphasis to your text (italics and bold) can help readers scan through your content by highlighting words and phrases that carry more weight. As a bonus it can also help your SEO efforts as search engines also use text emphasis in their relavancy algorithms.

Surround text with *single asterisks* to italicise text.

Surround text with **double asterisks** to embolden text.

Surround text with single asterisks to italicise text.

Surround text with double asterisks to embolden text.


Lists

Lists allow you to simplify long sentences and paragraphs. And they allow you to pull out and emphasise important ideas. And with Markdown, a list really couldn’t be simpler.

1. Start an ordered list with the number 1
2. And carry on
3. And on...

- Start an unordered list with a dash
- And carry on
- And on...
  1. Start an ordered list with the number 1
  2. And carry on
  3. And on…
  • Start an unordered list with a dash
  • And carry on
  • And on…

Links

Hyperlinks are the life and soul of the web. Markdown actually provides two alternative ways of linking: inline links and reference links.

An [inline link](https://google.com) contains the anchor text in square brackets and the URL in parentheses.

A [reference link](1) contains an arbitrary reference in paratheses with the URL referenced elsewhere in the document.

[1]: https://google.com

An inline link contains the anchor text in square brackets and the URL in parentheses.

A reference link contains an arbitrary reference in paratheses with the URL referenced elsewhere in the document.


Images

Adding images to your articles can create a pause to your content and break up longer passages of text. And, as they say, a picture is worth a thousand words. The Markdown syntax for an image is: ![alt text](image url)

Pro tip: if your image is hosted on Bitpost, we will use it in the metadata for your articles, resulting in 100% sexier link unfurling.

![Bitpost](https://www.bitpost.app/images/logo@2x.png)

Bitpost


Blockquote

Mark up a passage of text as a blockquote simply by prefixing the paragraph with >.

> The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.


Code blocks

Technical writers can include code examples in their writing. Bitpost also supports syntax highlighting for a number of popular languages.

Three backticks surround a code block.

```javascript
console.log('hello world')
```

Single backticks surround inline code: `console.log('hello world')`

Three backticks surround a code block.

console.log('hello world')

Single backticks surround inline code: console.log('hello world')


Horizontal rule

When a heading won’t do the job and it makes sense to break up long form text into semantic sections, use a horizontal rule with three dashes.

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